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THE FOLLOWING IS RECORDED IN DEED BOOK J OF HENRY COUNTY, TENNESSEE.

 
 
My Pioneer Ancestry

Thomas Leonard Frazier:

    Born June 2, 1827, in Henry County, Tennessee; the son of Thomas and Jane Frazier of North Carolina, his mother Jane having been born in Fayetteville, Cumberland Co., North Carolina. With the western movement and expansion, his parents imigrated about 1825 to Henry County, Tennessee where they made their made their home.

THE FOLLOWING IS RECORDED IN DEED BOOK J OF HENRY COUNTY, TENNESSEE.
    "To Thomas Frazier by Richard Swor a certain tract or parcel of land containing 60 acres, a part of a tract of 482 acres granted to said Richard Swor lying in the said County of Henry, 12th District 8th Section. Dated May 13, 1825

THE FOLLOWING IS QUOTED FROM JOURNAL HISTORY OF THE CHURCH. UNDER THIS DAY (JULY 18, 1836) ELDER WILFORD WOODRUFF MAKES THE FOLLOWING JOURNAL EVENT:
    "I rode in company with A. I. Smoot to a ferry on the Tennessee River. The ferryman was absent. We were offered the use of the boat and ferried over ourselves; but not being much used to the business, and losing one oar in the river and having to row with a broken oar, we landed a great distance below the usual place with a high circulation of blood and blistered hands; but our horses leapt the bank and we went on our way to the Sandy, which we swam and spent the night at Thomas Frazier's." It must have been only a matter of short time until death called the father of the family with which these Mormon missionaries spent the night. We are told that Thomas Leonard's father died while he was just a young lad and that his death was a result of poisoning.

THE FOLLOWING IS TAKEN FROM HENRY COUNTY COURT MINUTES 1836-1849, PAGE 13, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1836:
    "It appearing to the satisfaction of the court that Thomas Frazier Jr. late a resident citizen of Henry Co. at the time of his death and died intestate, leaving Jane Frazier, his widow and next of kin, where upon motion it is ordered by the court that letters of administration of all and singular the goods and chatter's rights and credits of said deceased issue to Jane Frazier and John H. Williams who there upon entered into bond of twelve hundred dollars with James C. Gainer and Solomon Copland as their security and were qualified according to law." From records and information at hand it appears that after the death of his father, Thomas Leonard, his mother (Jane), sister (Martha Jane), and two brothers (Andrew Jackson and Warren) left Tennessee between 1844 and 1846 and traveled to Nauvoo, Illinois, where they joined the main body of the saints.
    The Temple Endowment records reveal that Thomas Leonard, his mother and sister received their Endowments in the Nauvoo Temple, January 31, 1846, just prior to its desecration by those who opposed the teachings and standards of Mormonism. It is also recorded that Martha Jane was married to Francis Marion Williams prior to their leaving Nauvoo. In the dead of winter and shortly after their Endowments had been taken care of, the Frazier family, with thousands of the Saints were driven from their homes, possessions and beloved city, Nauvoo, the Beautiful. The hand of fate had smitten its fateful blow. Their beloved Prophet, their homes and all that was near and dear was taken from them. But even this persecution could not take from them their abiding testimony of the truthfulness of the Restored Gospel which they had received.
    With great faith and courage they commenced what proved to be a long arduous journey toward the west. "A modern Israel feeing into the wilderness." Numbered among these faithful and courageous pioneers was the Frazier family. "It was while traveling through what is now the state of Iowa with their three thousand wagons, thirty thousand head of cattle, sheep, horses, and mules, their camps were visited by Captain James Allen, of the United States Army who asked for a contigent of  "able bodied men to serve in the war with Mexico".
    Continuing on to Council Bluffs where Brigham Young was with the main encampment, Captain Allen laid the matter of recruiting a battalion of soldiers before the Mormon leader, who decided to furnish five hundred men immediately. Within two weeks the Battalion was ready to march. The true spirit of the gospel was manifest by both men and women. The night before the new Army were to commence their long journey, everyone gathered to the bowery where square dancing and a cheerful party drowned the sorrow of parting.
    On July 20 the troops started on their journey numbered among those gallant soldiers in Company D, was Private Thomas Leonard Frazier.
    From the journals of members of the Battalion we learn there was much suffering in the camps.
    With General P. St. George Cooke in command of the Battalion continued their journey southward by way of the Rio Grande and Gila Rivers. The very meager rations were served during the journey. The march of the Battalion along the Gila and through the sands and deserts of the Southwest, is a story of patience and faith hardly equalled in history.
    It was a strange-looking army that trailed along day after day. Barefooted much of the time, the men suffered with sore feet, and the heat of the sun burned their skin terribly. The hides and tails of animals were used for food.
    The deserts were terrible, the crossing of the Colorado River was a bitter experience for they waded the stream, the water at times reaching their arm-pits.
    After a long and treacherous journey they reached California without conflict or battle as President Brigham Young had prophesied they would providing they kept the commandments of the Lord.
    On July 15, the Battalion was mustered out at Los Angeles although a few of the men re-enlisted for service. Of those mustered out, two hundred and forty of them organized themselves into a command and proceeded to the American River, not far from Sutter's Fort. Some found employment with Captain Sutter, while the main company crossed the Sierras by way of Donner Pass. Here they met Sam Brannan, and were informed that the Saints had arrived in the valley of Great Salt Lake. Tyler, with men under his command reached Salt Lake City in October 1847, and was given a hearty welcome. The next year the remaining members of the Battalion, with many others who had gone to California on the ship "Brooklyn" in 1848, joined their relatives and friends in the valley.
    It is not known at this time with which one of these groups Thomas Leonard Frazier returned to Great Salt Lake Valley; but he had arrived at the Valley by Feb. 1849. We are told that he was at Sutter's Fort at the time that gold was discovered and that he brought enough gold dust from California in his saddle bags for a wedding stake.
    Being a brave and handsome hero; his majesty touched the heart of that lovely lady; Miss Rachel Maxfield Young (adopted daughter of Brigham Young), herself a pioneer and a daughter of Valentine Whitman Young and Jemina Angell Young, by birth.